Hays Canada Viewpoint

blog_hays canada_banner.jpg

Whether hiring or looking for your next career, we want to ensure you are equipped with the information you need for recruitment or job seeking success. This blog is the recruitment resource you need, from your Canadian recruitment experts.

Get the latest insights and market research from top industries including construction and property, resources and mining, technology, and banking and financial, and learn from our team's breadth of knowledge on different functions such as accounting, IT, estimating, human resources, procurement and supply chain.

What is your body language saying in job interviews?

Posted by Rowan O'Grady, Hays Canada President, on Thursday, Jun 23, 2016

Hays Blog: Perfect your interview body language Your resume is updated, cover letter is targeted, and interview answers are prepared - but could your body languagewin or lose you the next job? Negative body language could be enough to deny you the job.

Hiring managers can tell about someone’s personality simply by observing how they sit in an interview.  For example, if you are slouched in the chair, tapping your foot or fidgeting, you’ll come across as disinterested and, worse, rude.

Here's your 5 step checklist to perfect your pose.

1. Come prepared
Preparation for an interview always builds confidence and when you’re confident you have fewer body language issues. If you struggle with confidence then try just pretending to be confident – this is one of the tips offered in Susie Timlin’s ‘7 ways to communicate confidence’ blog. Your body language and personality could be the game changer if you are up against someone with the same qualifications and experience. Practice it with a friend or family member; tell them what to look out for.

2. Wait patiently
You begin to be judged on your interview performance as soon as you walk in the door of the building. It’s common practice for the receptionist to report back to the interviewer on your general demeanour and attitude; even slouching in the waiting area could cost you. Spend the short period before the interview thinking about how you will say hello, all the while sitting in a straight and upright neutral position.

3. Sit confidently
Once in the interview room rest your arms on the arms of the chair or your legs and try and keep them there. While using gestures to convey a point can help show your passion, excessive hand movements can make it seem like you are trying to express yourself a bit too frantically; let your words do the talking. Folding your arms and legs can be seen as an aggressive stance; something which will count against you if you’re being interviewed for a very social, team dependent role!

Avoid touching your face and hair as it distracts the interviewer – they might think you are not comfortable with the questions being asked.

4. Maintain eye-contact
Make lots of eye contact during the interview, both when you are listening and when you are speaking. It’s a great way to convey a sense of calmness and control, but don’t go overboard. It’s not a staring match and it’s normal for the other person to break off contact throughout the interview. This is a very important form of non-verbal communication.

5. Sign-off with a smile
After you’ve pulled off a flawless verbal and non-verbal interview performance sign it off with a handshake and a smile. A firm grip, sustained eye contact, a genuine smile and the usual pleasantries are the perfect way for the interviewer to remember you.

A final thought
Even if you are not feeling confident you can give off the impression that you are by adapting your body language. Sitting up straight, communicating clearly, maintaining eye contact and smiling are the main pillars of body language interview success.

Ready to find your next career move? Search for opportunities today, or contact your local Hays office

Talk to Rowan O'Grady, Hays Canada President, on the Canadian labour market.

Join us on social media for the latest jobs and hiring market insights 

facebook- 60x60.png twitter.png linkedin.png
 

 

More Sharing Services | Share on email Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on favorites Share on print